Mentoring: The Transfer of Knowledge

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Mentoring: The Transfer of Knowledge

     When I came to understand our MWN definition for mentoring as “a transfer of knowledge,” I realized that I have lived a successful life as the result of a series of mentors, even though I may not have labeled them as mentors at the time.  I had shared in an earlier blog that at the age of 16, I was told by father that “I could do anything I wanted – and would be a success.”  It was that “transfer of knowledge/faith in me” that made it possible for me to start a series of businesses over the last 3+ decades, with never a single moment of doubt, because my mentor/father, told me I could!
     Another mentor was the first boss I had out of college, a U.S. Senator in Washington, D.C., who taught me how to listen to constituents in a way that allowed them to feel heard.  He also taught me the art of “working a room” – a skill that I continue to use to this day.  I’ve never had a fear of entering a room of strangers and wondering who I could talk to and what I would talk about.  Thank you, Senator Ralph Yarborough.
     Perhaps one of my most influential mentors was Dr. Stephen R. Covey, for whom I had the pleasure of working for 18 years.  While his 7 Habits book “mentored” the millions who read them, it was his message to us as employees on one occasion that truly shaped how I try to live my life:  “We are here to do 4 things:  to live, to love, to learn, and to leave a legacy.”  He also taught me that “it is easier to say no when there is a larger yes burning inside.”
     AND, I have had strong women mentors as well:  Marsha Clark, with whom I co-authored “Choose!  The Role Choice Plays in Shaping Women’s Lives;” and Jan Belcher, my BFF, who corners me when I try to play small and challenges me to move in another direction.
     A true mentor looks for ways to always be alert for opportunities to support, help, assist, and challenge those around her – to grow, to learn, to play, and to live an extraordinary life.
     Let’s hear it for all of us who have succeeded because we mentor and because we allowed ourselves to be mentored!
Dottie Gandy
Dottie Gandy
Dottie is the founder of The Up to Something Group in Dallas, TX, whose members choose to be intentional about designing the lives they want – and create extraordinary results in the process. She was the regional director for the Franklin Covey Company in Dallas, and continued her relationship with that organization for more than 20 years. An avid supporter of women in business, Dottie was a co-founder of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO). She was also a corporate executive for 10 years with Giant Food, Inc. in Washington, D.C., a Fortune 500 food retailer, where she administered 16 of the company’s labor contracts. Dottie is a native Texan, with a B.A. in Communications from Baylor University. She currently resides in Fairview, Texas. Although much of her adult life was spent in Washington, D. C., she returned to Texas in 1991 to marry her college sweetheart, Tom Gandy. Dottie has two daughters, one stepson, and four extraordinary grandchildren.

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